Difference between revisions of "VanRoy"

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[[Image:Vanroy.jpg|thumb|right|October, 1944 Advertisement]]The VanRoy Pipe Company, originally located in the Empire State Building in New York City, began as its own pipe company, and the originator of the Ajustomatic feature better known from its later use in [[Dr. Grabow]] pipes.  No evidence can be found of their existence prior to October, 1944.  When [[Henry Leonard & Thomas Inc.]] moved to Sparta, North Carolina in 1953, in addition to purchasing the rights to the [[Dr. Grabow]] line, they also purchased other New York pipe firms, including the VanRoy company.  After moving to Sparta, HL&T at some point revived the VanRoy name for a cheaper line of pipes, but the later pipes did not have the ajustomatic feature, and instead a push tenon.   
 
[[Image:Vanroy.jpg|thumb|right|October, 1944 Advertisement]]The VanRoy Pipe Company, originally located in the Empire State Building in New York City, began as its own pipe company, and the originator of the Ajustomatic feature better known from its later use in [[Dr. Grabow]] pipes.  No evidence can be found of their existence prior to October, 1944.  When [[Henry Leonard & Thomas Inc.]] moved to Sparta, North Carolina in 1953, in addition to purchasing the rights to the [[Dr. Grabow]] line, they also purchased other New York pipe firms, including the VanRoy company.  After moving to Sparta, HL&T at some point revived the VanRoy name for a cheaper line of pipes, but the later pipes did not have the ajustomatic feature, and instead a push tenon.   
  
The stem logo for VanRoy was a fleur de lis, originally filled, and the pipes were marked as patent pending for the early ajustomatics.  In 1949 the pipes began to carry a patented stamp, with the 2461905 patent number representing the 1949 patenting of the ajustomatic feature, as well as a stamp stating "Magic Cake", but no fleur de lis was on the stems.  After 1953, pipes have been seen with a fleur de lis again on the stem, but an open design, not a filled one.   
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[[File:VanRoyBard15.jpg|thumb|Courtesy Doug Valitchka]]The stem logo for VanRoy was a fleur de lis, originally filled, and the pipes were marked as patent pending for the early ajustomatics.  In 1949 the pipes began to carry a patented stamp, with the 2461905 patent number representing the 1949 patenting of the ajustomatic feature, as well as a stamp stating "Magic Cake", but no fleur de lis was on the stems.  After 1953, pipes have been seen with a fleur de lis again on the stem, but an open design, not a filled one.   
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<center><gallery widths=200px caption="Examples, details, and nomenclature, courtesy Doug Valitchka">
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File:VanRoy01a.jpg
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File:VanRoy07a.jpg
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File:VanRoy09.jpg
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File:VanRoyBard01.jpg
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File:VanRoyBard05.jpg
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File:VanRoyBard07.jpg
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File:VanRoyBard12.jpg
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</gallery></center>
  
 
[[Category: Pipe makers by nationality]][[Category: United States]]
 
[[Category: Pipe makers by nationality]][[Category: United States]]

Revision as of 02:43, 19 May 2016

October, 1944 Advertisement

The VanRoy Pipe Company, originally located in the Empire State Building in New York City, began as its own pipe company, and the originator of the Ajustomatic feature better known from its later use in Dr. Grabow pipes. No evidence can be found of their existence prior to October, 1944. When Henry Leonard & Thomas Inc. moved to Sparta, North Carolina in 1953, in addition to purchasing the rights to the Dr. Grabow line, they also purchased other New York pipe firms, including the VanRoy company. After moving to Sparta, HL&T at some point revived the VanRoy name for a cheaper line of pipes, but the later pipes did not have the ajustomatic feature, and instead a push tenon.

Courtesy Doug Valitchka

The stem logo for VanRoy was a fleur de lis, originally filled, and the pipes were marked as patent pending for the early ajustomatics. In 1949 the pipes began to carry a patented stamp, with the 2461905 patent number representing the 1949 patenting of the ajustomatic feature, as well as a stamp stating "Magic Cake", but no fleur de lis was on the stems. After 1953, pipes have been seen with a fleur de lis again on the stem, but an open design, not a filled one.