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→‎Shell: US patent date add
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==== Shell ====
 
==== Shell ====
[[Image:DunhillI.jpg|thumb|A 1937 Shell LB, G.L. Pease collection[http://pipedia.org/index.php?title=The_Mystery_of_the_White_Spot_-_Pipes_from_Dunhill]]]A deep craggy sandblast with a black stain finish. Duhill pantended the sandblast finish in 1917 (Patent No. 1484/17). See [[The Art of Sandblasting]], and by R.D. Field, for in depth look at Dunhill's revolutionary new finish. The deepest and craggiest finishes were from Algerian briar, which is softer and yields more to the blasting. These are found in circa 1920's, 1940's, and 1960's Shells. The pipes were double blasted until the 1960's, and then the double blast technique resumed in the 1980's calling it the "Deep Shell" finish. During the 1960’s and 70’s Dunhill could not acquire the Algerian briar. Consequently, the company’s sandblast pipes were much shallower and less distinct. Once again Dunhill showed itself to be innovative, inventing the “double blast” technique to bring about a deeper blast even with harder briar. The black shell sandblast finish uses a stain the was developed for the color, not the taste. They hvve a more bitter taste, even when well smoked.
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[[Image:DunhillI.jpg|thumb|A 1937 Shell LB, G.L. Pease collection[http://pipedia.org/index.php?title=The_Mystery_of_the_White_Spot_-_Pipes_from_Dunhill]]]A deep craggy sandblast with a black stain finish. Duhill pantended the sandblast finish in England in 1917 (Patent No. 1484/17) and the U.S. in 1920 (Patent No. 1,341,418). See [[The Art of Sandblasting]], and by R.D. Field, for in depth look at Dunhill's revolutionary new finish. The deepest and craggiest finishes were from Algerian briar, which is softer and yields more to the blasting. These are found in circa 1920's, 1940's, and 1960's Shells. The pipes were double blasted until the 1960's, and then the double blast technique resumed in the 1980's calling it the "Deep Shell" finish. During the 1960’s and 70’s Dunhill could not acquire the Algerian briar. Consequently, the company’s sandblast pipes were much shallower and less distinct. Once again Dunhill showed itself to be innovative, inventing the “double blast” technique to bring about a deeper blast even with harder briar. The black shell sandblast finish uses a stain the was developed for the color, not the taste. They hvve a more bitter taste, even when well smoked.
 
[[Image:CraggyDunhill.jpg|thumb|300px|left|A 1934 Dunhill Shell Patent Pipe - Note the deep and craggy sandblast that early Dunhill Shells were famous for - Courtesy of Mike Ahmadi]]
 
[[Image:CraggyDunhill.jpg|thumb|300px|left|A 1934 Dunhill Shell Patent Pipe - Note the deep and craggy sandblast that early Dunhill Shells were famous for - Courtesy of Mike Ahmadi]]
 
[[Image:Dunhill120.jpg|thumb|300px|center|Top: A 1927 Dunhill Shell Patent Pipe 120 Shape Bottom: A 1965 Dunhill Shell 120 Shape - Note how the size, depth of sandblast, and overall design changed over time. It should be noted that the 1927 model has a replacement mouthpiece, and has had a shank repair.  Early 120 shape pipes are notorious for having thin and elegant shanks that are prone to breakage  - Courtesy of Mike Ahmadi]]
 
[[Image:Dunhill120.jpg|thumb|300px|center|Top: A 1927 Dunhill Shell Patent Pipe 120 Shape Bottom: A 1965 Dunhill Shell 120 Shape - Note how the size, depth of sandblast, and overall design changed over time. It should be noted that the 1927 model has a replacement mouthpiece, and has had a shank repair.  Early 120 shape pipes are notorious for having thin and elegant shanks that are prone to breakage  - Courtesy of Mike Ahmadi]]
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