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So Bo bought two blocks and started to work on them with the tools he had at hand. As he was filing and grinding he found more and more faults in the wood. This he could not tolerate so he carried on filing to get rid of the faults. New faults appeared and in the end there was not a lot left of the block, at least not enough to make a pipe. New blocks were bought but the result was the same. After some time Bo realized that he could not go on like that.
 
So Bo bought two blocks and started to work on them with the tools he had at hand. As he was filing and grinding he found more and more faults in the wood. This he could not tolerate so he carried on filing to get rid of the faults. New faults appeared and in the end there was not a lot left of the block, at least not enough to make a pipe. New blocks were bought but the result was the same. After some time Bo realized that he could not go on like that.
   −
Apparently all blocks had larger or minor faults and the only way was to adept the design of the pipe in such a way that the faults were avoided.
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Apparently all blocks had larger or minor faults and the only way was to adapt the design of the pipe in such a way that the faults were avoided.
    
This improved things no end and after that he went regularly to PIP-LARSSON for more briar blocks.
 
This improved things no end and after that he went regularly to PIP-LARSSON for more briar blocks.
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When Bo receives a new shipment of briar he first roughly grinds all blocks on the smooth side. The knotty side is brushed with a steel brush. Bad blocks are thrown out, the rest are stored in one of the neighbour's cellar to ensure that all water evaporates slowly. They are then moved to Bo's cold storage and in the autumn, when the temperature is about the same outside and inside, they are moved into the workshop. "You have to sneak them into room-temperature," as Bo expresses it. He then grinds them finely and classifies them after which they stay in storage for at least 3-5 years. Many, as I said, stay there considerably longer.
 
When Bo receives a new shipment of briar he first roughly grinds all blocks on the smooth side. The knotty side is brushed with a steel brush. Bad blocks are thrown out, the rest are stored in one of the neighbour's cellar to ensure that all water evaporates slowly. They are then moved to Bo's cold storage and in the autumn, when the temperature is about the same outside and inside, they are moved into the workshop. "You have to sneak them into room-temperature," as Bo expresses it. He then grinds them finely and classifies them after which they stay in storage for at least 3-5 years. Many, as I said, stay there considerably longer.
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When I ask him if it really is necessary to store the blocks for such a long time Bo answers that this is the time it takes for the blocks to dry out completely and for the pores to close. If they are used earlier the wood shrink when the pipe is ready, which can be noticed as the tenon will not fit very well.
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When I ask him if it really is necessary to store the blocks for such a long time Bo answers that this is the time it takes for the blocks to dry out completely and for the pores to close. If they are used earlier the wood shrinks when the pipe is ready, which can be noticed as the tenon will not fit very well.
       
'''TO "READ" WOOD'''
 
'''TO "READ" WOOD'''
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Bo takes down one briar block after another. To me they all look perfect but Bo points and explains: "Here you see a failed annual ring which will have brought with it lots of faults," he says. On another block he shows me lines and areas on the knotty side which conceal bad areas or sections with thin graining inside the block. Nothing is shown on the outside that I can see, but Bo knows what he will find when he starts grinding. You could say that he reads the blocks like I read a book. It is of course based on long experience, but I also believe that it requires quite a bit of inborn talent.
+
Bo takes down one briar block after another. To me they all look perfect, but Bo points and explains: "Here you see a failed annual ring which will have brought with it lots of faults," he says. On another block he shows me lines and areas on the knotty side which conceal bad areas or sections with thin graining inside the block. Nothing is shown on the outside that I can see, but Bo knows what he will find when he starts grinding. You could say that he reads the blocks like I read a book. It is of course based on long experience, but I also believe that it requires quite a bit of inborn talent.
    
Of course it is not that simple even for Bo. He does not know everything that is concealed in a block. He is subjected to surprises as well and about every second block will never become a pipe. Briar is indeed a difficult material.
 
Of course it is not that simple even for Bo. He does not know everything that is concealed in a block. He is subjected to surprises as well and about every second block will never become a pipe. Briar is indeed a difficult material.
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Bo finishes the pipes completely, he even polishes them, before he drills them. The reason is that he does not want to have any restrictions when he designs the pipe. He often has to change the design as he grinds as new faults appear.
 
Bo finishes the pipes completely, he even polishes them, before he drills them. The reason is that he does not want to have any restrictions when he designs the pipe. He often has to change the design as he grinds as new faults appear.
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When the pipe is ready the tobacco hole is drilled first and then the hole for the tennon, lastly the smoke channel. Bo has by experimenting found a method which is so reliable that he has never been unsuccessful when drilling a pipe. One has to remember that Bo is never careless or hasty, at least not when he makes his pipes.
+
When the pipe is ready the tobacco hole is drilled first and then the hole for the tennon, lastly the smoke channel. Bo has, by experimenting, found a method which is so reliable that he has never been unsuccessful when drilling a pipe. One has to remember that Bo is never careless or hasty, at least not when he makes his pipes.
    
He demonstrates the entire procedure to me, but it is a bit to complicated to describe here.
 
He demonstrates the entire procedure to me, but it is a bit to complicated to describe here.
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'''AS AN OPEN BOOK'''
 
'''AS AN OPEN BOOK'''
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The afternoon has passed quickly, too quickly, and the time is approaching when I have to leave. During my entire visit I have bombarded Bo with questions and he has answered them willingly all the time. Many of the methods he uses he has invented himself often after having tried many different ways and I am a bit surprised that he is so open about everything. "Don't you have any secrets?" I wonder, "aren't you afraid that others will copy you?" "No," says Bo, "they are welcome to do that. Sixten was always entirely open to me so why should I conceal anything?"
+
The afternoon has passed quickly, too quickly, and the time is approaching when I have to leave. During my entire visit I have bombarded Bo with questions and he has answered them willingly all the time. Many of the methods he uses he has invented himself often after having tried many different ways and I am a bit surprised that he is so open about everything. "Don't you have any secrets?" I wonder, "Aren't you afraid that others will copy you?" "No," says Bo, "they are welcome to do that. Sixten was always entirely open to me so why should I conceal anything?"
    
With this generous statement I will finish my story about Bo Nordh.
 
With this generous statement I will finish my story about Bo Nordh.
 
[[Image:Bo Nordh.jpg|left|thumb]]
 
[[Image:Bo Nordh.jpg|left|thumb]]

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