A DUNHILL ODA SHAPE CHART

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Written by John C. Loring
Contributed by Yang Forcióri

ILLUSTRATED AND ANNOTATED
Image002 (1).jpg 801 Belge, Cocked bowl (5) large for shape – early dating extremely rare. Image004 (1).jpg 802 Bent Antique, spur (4) old inventory finished in ‘70s/’80s with non ODA #s – early dating extremely rare.
Image006.jpg 805 Skater (4) CH shape – early dating extremely rare. Image008.jpg 806 Apple, Tapered Bit.
Image010.jpg 821 Danish Bent (4) old inventory finished in ‘70s/’80s with non ODA #s – early dating extremely rare. Image012.jpg 827 Rhodesian, Small – early dating extremely rare.
Image014.jpg 830 Liverpool - early dating extremely rare. Image016.jpg 831 Bent, Cocked bowl (4) old inventory finished in ‘70s/’80s with non ODA #s – early dating quite rare.
Image018.jpg 832 Lovat – early dating quite rare. Image020.jpg 833 Danish Style Bent – early dating extremely rare.
Image022.jpg 834 Prince – early dating quite rare. Image024.jpg 835 Billiard, Tapered Bit.
Image026.jpg 836 Square Panel Image028.jpg 837 Bulldog
Image030.jpg 838 Straight Rhodesian – early dating rare. Image032.jpg 839 Qtr Bent Rhodesian – early dating rare.
Image034.jpg 840 Bent Billiard- I find it difficult to distinguish the 840 from the 846 – early dating are rare. Image036.jpg 841 Lovat – early dating rare.
Image038.jpg 842 Apple, Saddle Bit –early dating rare- (later stamped 6806). Image040.jpg 843 Billiard, Saddle Bit -early dating rare - (later stamped 6835).
Image042.jpg 844 Poker – early dating extremely rare. Image044.jpg 845 Canadian, Large Bowl.
Image046.jpg 846 Bent Apple, Saddle - I find it difficult to distinguish the 840 from the 846 – early dating rare. Image048.jpg 847 Rhodesian, Quarter Bent, Round Shank – early dating quite rare.
Image050.jpg 848 Dublin Image052.jpg 849 Stacked Billiard - the 849 is thinner & taller then the 856 – early dating extremely rare.
Image054.jpg 850 Canadian, Small Bowl. Image056.jpg 851 Canadian, Small Bowl, Extra Long – early dating extremely rare.
Image058.jpg 853 Pot – early dating rare Image060.jpg 855 Canadian, Large Bowl, Extra Long – early dating extremely rare.
Image062.jpg 856 Stack Billiard - the 849 is thinner & taller then the 856 – early dating extremely rare. Image064.jpg 857 Bent Brandy – early dating quite rare.
Image066.jpg 863 Squat Panel, Front Bottom Curve (4) – early dating extremely rare. Image068.jpg 865 Angled Convex Rectangular Panel (5) – old inventory apparently finished in ‘70s/’80s in Shell finish - early dating extremely rare.
Image070.jpg 866 Square Bowl (4) – early dating extremely rare.
No Pictures (missed)
803 Odd Bent (4) – early dating extremely rare. 804 Odd Bent (4) – early dating extremely rare.
818 Oom Paul (5) – early dating extremely rare. 824 Brandy Glass – early dating extremely rare.
854 Rhodesian, Full Bent – early dating extremely rare. 861 Angled Squat Panel Bowl, Tapered Square Shank – early dating extremely rare. 862 Dublin Panel – early dating extremely rare.


Notes:

  • 1. the pictured pipes are not in scale with each other.
  • 2. heavily framed shapes indicate the ‘semi giant’ shapes commonly termed today “ODAs”.
  • 3.”(4)” & “(5)’ indicate approximate group number size.
  • 4.” extremely rare” is rarer then” quite rare” which in turn is rarer then” rare”.
  • 5. all rarity indication go to the 1950s/1960s period – for later, less collectible, years the situation may be quite different.
  • 6. rarity does not necessarily translate into premium values – ‘non-semi giant’ shapes generally find little interest even at low prices even if extremely rare, and the same can hold true for less popular ‘semi giant’ shapes. Conversely, relatively common but highly desirable shapes such as the 835 will sell at a premium because of their popularity. In other words “value” is the product of supply & demand, not rarity.
  • 7. “old inventory finished in ‘70s/’80s’ refers to factory inventories of unfinished bowls that were set aside in the 1950s due to a lack of consumer demand (not all pipes later finished from these bowls were exactly consistent with the original shapes).


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Yang (talk) 08:47, 14 August 2019 (CDT)