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[[File:Kaywoodie Silverleaf.jpg|thumb|KBB Silerleaf, courtesy Doug Valitchka]]When one of the men from the New York office got "gold fever", he carried a large supply of pipes with him to California that he sold along the way. This early "national distribution" did much to build the reputation of KBB. By the late 1800's, branches of KBB were opened in Chicago, Atlanta, San Francisco and St. Louis with family and friends acting as agents. The trademarks, for the inlaid cloverleaf and the cloverleaf with the KBB initials inside, were issued in 1881. KBB's pipes became more popular and were in constant demand by the end of the century. Orders were streaming back east and KBB needed to move to larger manufacturing facilities. By 1915 the move was made to larger facilities in the old Union Hill section of Union City, New Jersey. The salesroom offices were located at 33 East 17th. Street, New York. When the Kaywoodie pipe was first introduced by KBB it came with a hand cut rubber mouthpiece fitted with an aluminum Inbore Tube. This device was to "assure a clean, cool smoke." Other KBB pipes such as Ambassador, Heatherby and Melrose also had the Inbore tube. The early Drinkless Kaywoodies from 1924 through 1931 had push bit stems. In 1931, after three years of research, the new Drinkless Kaywoodies with the synchro-stem, (threaded drinkless screw-in mouthpiece) were introduced. The drinkless attachment was advertised as cooling the smoke from 850 degrees in the bowl to 82 degrees when it entered the mouth. By the mid 1930's, all Kaywoodie's came with the screw mounted Drinkless attachment. (Export Kaywoodies, available briefly from 1950-1955, had push bit stems and were available in all the same shapes and finishes as the drinkless versions.)
 
[[File:Kaywoodie Silverleaf.jpg|thumb|KBB Silerleaf, courtesy Doug Valitchka]]When one of the men from the New York office got "gold fever", he carried a large supply of pipes with him to California that he sold along the way. This early "national distribution" did much to build the reputation of KBB. By the late 1800's, branches of KBB were opened in Chicago, Atlanta, San Francisco and St. Louis with family and friends acting as agents. The trademarks, for the inlaid cloverleaf and the cloverleaf with the KBB initials inside, were issued in 1881. KBB's pipes became more popular and were in constant demand by the end of the century. Orders were streaming back east and KBB needed to move to larger manufacturing facilities. By 1915 the move was made to larger facilities in the old Union Hill section of Union City, New Jersey. The salesroom offices were located at 33 East 17th. Street, New York. When the Kaywoodie pipe was first introduced by KBB it came with a hand cut rubber mouthpiece fitted with an aluminum Inbore Tube. This device was to "assure a clean, cool smoke." Other KBB pipes such as Ambassador, Heatherby and Melrose also had the Inbore tube. The early Drinkless Kaywoodies from 1924 through 1931 had push bit stems. In 1931, after three years of research, the new Drinkless Kaywoodies with the synchro-stem, (threaded drinkless screw-in mouthpiece) were introduced. The drinkless attachment was advertised as cooling the smoke from 850 degrees in the bowl to 82 degrees when it entered the mouth. By the mid 1930's, all Kaywoodie's came with the screw mounted Drinkless attachment. (Export Kaywoodies, available briefly from 1950-1955, had push bit stems and were available in all the same shapes and finishes as the drinkless versions.)
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<gallery widths=250px heights=185px caption="Early Kaywoodie examples and details, courtesy Doug Valitchka">
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File:KB&B4203KaywoodieA01.jpg|Shape 4203
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File:KB&B4203KaywoodieA05.jpg|Shape 4203 detail
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File:KB&B4203KaywoodieA06.jpg|Shape 4203 detail
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File:KB&B4203KaywoodieB01.jpg|Shape 4203 detail
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File:KB&B4223Kay08.jpg|Shape 4223 detail
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File:KB&B4223Kay11.jpg|Shape 4223 detail
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File:KB&B4225Billiard01.jpg|Shape 4225
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File:KB&B4225Billiard09.jpg|Shape 4225 detail
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File:KB&B4225Billiard10.jpg|Shape 4225 detail
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File:KB&B4225Billiard11.jpg|Shape 4225 detail
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File:KB&BinBox01.jpg|Early Kaywoodied Bin with original box & sock
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File:KB&BinBox07.jpg|Bin Detail
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File:KB&BinBox11.jpg|Bin Detail
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File:KB&BinBox08.jpg|Bin Box detail
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File:KB&BinBox12.jpg|Bin Box detail
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File:KB&BKayPUP01.jpg|Pup
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File:KB&BKayPUP02.jpg|Pup detail
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File:KB&BKayPUP10.jpg|Pup detail
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File:KB&BKayPUP12.jpg|Pup detail
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File:KB&BKayPUP16.jpg|Pup detail
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File:KB&BKaywoodieC01.jpg|C
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File:KB&BKaywoodieC07.jpg|C detail
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File:KB&BKaywoodieC08.jpg|C detail
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File:KB&BKaywoodieC09.jpg|C detail
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File:KB&BLargePipe01.jpg|Large
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File:KB&BLargePipe07.jpg|Large detail
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File:KB&BLargePipe08.jpg|Large detail
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File:KB&BLargePipe10.jpg|Large detail
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File:KBBD1Kaywoodie01.jpg|D-1
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File:KBBD1Kaywoodie07.jpg|D-1 Detail
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File:KBBD1Kaywoodie08.jpg|D-1 Detail
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</gallery>
    
Again, demand for KBB pipes and especially Kaywoodie prompted another move for both the manufacturing facilities and the corporate offices. In 1930 the corporate office moved into the Empire State Building on Fifth Avenue in New York. By 1935, the manufacturing operations moved from Union City to 6400 Broadway in West New York, New Jersey which, at the time, was touted as the largest pipe making facility in the world. At the height of production, there were 500 employees producing up to 10,000 pipes per day.
 
Again, demand for KBB pipes and especially Kaywoodie prompted another move for both the manufacturing facilities and the corporate offices. In 1930 the corporate office moved into the Empire State Building on Fifth Avenue in New York. By 1935, the manufacturing operations moved from Union City to 6400 Broadway in West New York, New Jersey which, at the time, was touted as the largest pipe making facility in the world. At the height of production, there were 500 employees producing up to 10,000 pipes per day.

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