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The last important co-worker was Mark Tinsky, a close friend of  Curt Rollar since Highschool days. Tinsky had already worked for JHW as a polisher when he graduated from school in 1976. As Rollar was on a longer vacation wandering through the Appalacian Mountains, Tinsky soon moved up to be a fulltime carver. He said later "I doubt I made anything of merit while working for Jack.."
 
The last important co-worker was Mark Tinsky, a close friend of  Curt Rollar since Highschool days. Tinsky had already worked for JHW as a polisher when he graduated from school in 1976. As Rollar was on a longer vacation wandering through the Appalacian Mountains, Tinsky soon moved up to be a fulltime carver. He said later "I doubt I made anything of merit while working for Jack.."
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Did we mention Frank Augsberger? Aged 17 he came down from Illinois as an apprentice. His mother had done the necessary negotiations, procured a flat and a car and everything else. The young man didn’t have any time at all, he was impatient and hasty and had the wildest conceptions about pipes. In a blue hour he once made a thing which his colleagues named "The Monster of Loch Ness" and even made JHW shake his head. Deeply frustrated Augsburger went back home after approximately six months. Nevertheless the time spent at JHW’s wasn’t completely wasted, because he became quite a good pipe maker years later.
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Did we mention Frank [[Augsburger]]? Aged 17 he came down from Illinois as an apprentice. His mother had done the necessary negotiations, procured a flat and a car and everything else. The young man didn’t have any time at all, he was impatient and hasty and had the wildest conceptions about pipes. In a blue hour he once made a thing which his colleagues named "The Monster of Loch Ness" and even made JHW shake his head. Deeply frustrated Augsburger went back home after approximately six months. Nevertheless the time spent at JHW’s wasn’t completely wasted, because he became quite a good pipe maker years later.
    
[[Image:JHW_11.jpg|thumb|left|]][[Image:JHW_12.jpg|thumb|right|]]Around 1976 JHW Pipes was on the height of its business success. The pipes sold much faster than they could be carved. Rollar was strictly watching over the quality. Weinberger himself however hardly made pipes anymore. And if so, he experimented or created strange pieces he shaped to the form of aeroplanes, toilets and other stuff like that.
 
[[Image:JHW_11.jpg|thumb|left|]][[Image:JHW_12.jpg|thumb|right|]]Around 1976 JHW Pipes was on the height of its business success. The pipes sold much faster than they could be carved. Rollar was strictly watching over the quality. Weinberger himself however hardly made pipes anymore. And if so, he experimented or created strange pieces he shaped to the form of aeroplanes, toilets and other stuff like that.
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Mark Tinsky said “He had great imagination and ingenuity. He was able to modernize the shop as it developed. He was great at getting publicity. He wasn’t afraid to take chances. He also was a pretty nice guy and good to work for. He loved and lived in the world of pipes. He was a real character and I’m happy to have had the chance to work under him.“
 
Mark Tinsky said “He had great imagination and ingenuity. He was able to modernize the shop as it developed. He was great at getting publicity. He wasn’t afraid to take chances. He also was a pretty nice guy and good to work for. He loved and lived in the world of pipes. He was a real character and I’m happy to have had the chance to work under him.“
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<center><gallery widths=250 heights=185 caption="Example and details, courtesy Doug Valitchka">
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<center><gallery widths=250 heights=185 caption="Examples and details, courtesy Doug Valitchka">
 
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